FLAC Albums Download

29Sep/17Off

Santana – The Best Of Santana (1998) [Reissue 2015] {SACD ISO + FLAC 24bit/88,2kHz}

Santana – The Best Of Santana (1998) [Reissue 2015]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 76:55 minutes | Scans included | 3,11 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Full Scans included | 1,48 GB
Genre: Rock

The Best of Santana is a 16-track collection that greatly expands the scope of Santana’s previous hits compilation, Greatest Hits. Drawing from the band’s entire 30-year career, the disc contains such familiar items as “Evil Ways,” “Jingo,” “Black Magic Woman/Gypsy Queen,” and “Oye Como Va,” but it also has a number of longtime favorites of the band and fans. Furthermore, all the songs have been subjected to Super Bit remastering, resulting in the best sound ever. For some casual fans, Greatest Hits remains definitive, since it’s a portrait of the band at its peak, but listeners wanting a career-spanning single-disc compilation will find that The Best of Santana suits their needs.

13Sep/17Off

Santana – Santana IV (2016) [HDTrack FLAC 24bit/48kHz]

Santana – Santana IV (2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/48 kHz | Time – 01:15:35 minutes | 969 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Artwork: Front cover | Label: Santana IV Records

April 15, 2016 marks the release date of Santana IV, the wildly anticipated studio album that reunites the revered early ‘70s lineup of guitar icon Carlos Santana (guitar, vocals), Gregg Rolie (keyboards, lead vocals), Neal Schon (guitar, vocals), Michael Carabello (percussion) and Michael Shrieve (drums). The album signifies the first time in 45 years – since 1971’s multi-platinum classic Santana III – that the quintet has recorded together.

31Jul/17Off

Santana – Santana III (1971) [MFSL 2016] {SACD ISO + FLAC 24bit/88,2kHz}

Santana – Santana (1969) [MFSL 2016]
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 41:07 minutes | Scans included | 1,67 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Full Scans included | 857 MB
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab # UDSACD 2158 | Genre: Rock

Santana III is an album that undeservingly stands in the shadows behind the towering legend that is the band’s second album, Abraxas. This was also the album that brought guitarist Neal Schon – who was 17 years old – into the original core lineup of Santana. Percussionist Thomas “Coke” Escovedo was brought in to replace (temporarily) José Chepitó Areas, who had suffered a brain aneurysm, yet who recovered quickly and rejoined the band. The rest were Carlos, organist Gregg Rolie, drummer Michael Schrieve, bassist David Brown, and conguero Michael Carabello. “Batuka” is the powerful first evidence of something being very different. The band was rawer, darker, and more powerful with twin leads and Schon’s harder, edgier rock & roll sound paired with Carlos’ blend of ecstatic high notes and soulful fills. It cooks – funky, mean, and tough. “Batuka” immediately transforms itself into “No One to Depend On,” by Escovedo, Carabello, and Rolie. The middle section is highlighted by frantic handclaps, call-and-response lines between Schon and Rolie, and Carlos joining the fray until the entire track explodes into a frenzied finale. And what’s most remarkable is that the set just keeps on cooking, from the subtle slow burn of “Taboo” to the percussive jam workout that is “Toussaint l’Overture,” a live staple in the band’s set list recorded here for the first time (and featuring some cooking Rolie organ work at its beginning). “Everybody’s Everything” is here, as is “Guajira” and “Jungle Strut” – tunes that are still part of Santana’s live show. With acoustic guitars, gorgeous hand percussion, and Santana’s fragile lead vocal, “Everything’s Coming Our Way” is the only “feel good” track here, but it’s a fitting way to begin winding the album down with its Schon and Santana guitar breaks. The album ends with a completely transformed reading of Tito Puente’s “Para los Rumberos,” complete with horns and frantic, almost insanely fast hand drumming and cowbell playing. It’s an album that has aged extremely well due to its spare production (by Carlos and the band) and its live sound. This is essential Santana, a record that deserves to be reconsidered in light of its lasting abundance and vision.

31Jul/17Off

Santana – Santana (1969) [MFSL 2015] {SACD ISO + FLAC 24bit/88,2kHz}

Santana – Santana (1969) [MFSL 2015]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 36:55 minutes | Scans included | 1,5 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Full Scans included | 728 MB
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab # UDSACD 2151 | Genre: Rock

Carlos Santana was originally in his own wing of the Latin Rock Hall of Fame, neither playing Afro-Cuban with rock guitar, as did Malo, nor flavoring mainstream rock with percussion, as did Chicago. His first record, as with the best fusion, created something a little different than just a mixture – a new style that, surprisingly, remains all his own. Granted that Latin music has seeped into the mainstream since, but why aren’t Van Halen and Metallica listening to this? Where they simmer, Santana boils over.

31Jul/17Off

Santana – Caravanserai (1972) [MFSL SACD 2011] {SACD ISO + FLAC 24bit/88,2kHz}

Santana – Caravanserai (1972) [MFSL SACD 2011]
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 51:27 minutes | Scans included | 2,13 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 1,04 GB
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab # UDSACD 2079 | Genre: Rock

Drawing on rock, salsa, and jazz, Santana recorded one imaginative, unpredictable gem after another during the 1970s. But Caravanserai is daring even by Santana’s high standards. Carlos Santana was obviously very hip to jazz fusion — something the innovative guitarist provides a generous dose of on the largely instrumental Caravanserai. Whether its approach is jazz-rock or simply rock, this album is consistently inspired and quite adventurous. Full of heartfelt, introspective guitar solos, it lacks the immediacy of Santana or Abraxas. Like the type of jazz that influenced it, this pearl (which marked the beginning of keyboardist/composer Tom Coster’s highly beneficial membership in the band) requires a number of listenings in order to be absorbed and fully appreciated. But make no mistake: this is one of Santana’s finest accomplishments.

31Jul/17Off

Santana – Abraxas (1970) [MFSL 2016] {SACD ISO + FLAC 24bit/88,2kHz}

Santana – Abraxas (1970) [MFSL 2016]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 37:09 minutes | Scans included | 1,52 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Full Scans included | 758 MB
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab # UDSACD 2151 | Genre: Rock

The San Francisco Bay Area rock scene of the late ’60s was one that encouraged radical experimentation and discouraged the type of mindless conformity that’s often plagued corporate rock. When one considers just how different Santana, Jefferson Airplane, Moby Grape, and the Grateful Dead sounded, it becomes obvious just how much it was encouraged. In the mid-’90s, an album as eclectic as Abraxas would be considered a marketing exec’s worst nightmare. But at the dawn of the 1970s, this unorthodox mix of rock, jazz, salsa, and blues proved quite successful. Whether adding rock elements to salsa king Tito Puente’s “Oye Como Va,” embracing instrumental jazz-rock on “Incident at Neshabur” and “Samba Pa Ti,” or tackling moody blues-rock on Fleetwood Mac’s “Black Magic Woman,” the band keeps things unpredictable yet cohesive. Many of the Santana albums that came out in the ’70s are worth acquiring, but for novices, Abraxas is an excellent place to start.

31Jul/17Off

Santana – Abraxas (1970) [Japanese SACD 2001] {SACD ISO + FLAC 24bit/88,2kHz}

Santana – Abraxas (1970) [Japanese SACD 2001 #SRGS 4583]
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 50:36 minutes | Scans included | 2,07 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 1,01 GB
Features the 1998 Remastering on SACD format | Genre: Rock

The San Francisco Bay Area rock scene of the late ’60s was one that encouraged radical experimentation and discouraged the type of mindless conformity that’s often plagued corporate rock. When one considers just how different Santana, Jefferson Airplane, Moby Grape, and the Grateful Dead sounded, it becomes obvious just how much it was encouraged. In the mid-’90s, an album as eclectic as Abraxas would be considered a marketing exec’s worst nightmare. But at the dawn of the 1970s, this unorthodox mix of rock, jazz, salsa, and blues proved quite successful. Whether adding rock elements to salsa king Tito Puente’s “Oye Como Va,” embracing instrumental jazz-rock on “Incident at Neshabur” and “Samba Pa Ti,” or tackling moody blues-rock on Fleetwood Mac’s “Black Magic Woman,” the band keeps things unpredictable yet cohesive. Many of the Santana albums that came out in the ’70s are worth acquiring, but for novices, Abraxas is an excellent place to start.

10Jun/17Off

Santana – The Best Of Santana (1998) [Reissue 2015] SACD ISO

Santana – The Best Of Santana (1998) [Reissue 2015]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 76:55 minutes | Scans included | 3,11 GB
Genre: Rock

The Best of Santana is a 16-track collection that greatly expands the scope of Santana’s previous hits compilation, Greatest Hits. Drawing from the band’s entire 30-year career, the disc contains such familiar items as “Evil Ways,” “Jingo,” “Black Magic Woman/Gypsy Queen,” and “Oye Como Va,” but it also has a number of longtime favorites of the band and fans. Furthermore, all the songs have been subjected to Super Bit remastering, resulting in the best sound ever. For some casual fans, Greatest Hits remains definitive, since it’s a portrait of the band at its peak, but listeners wanting a career-spanning single-disc compilation will find that The Best of Santana suits their needs.

Tracklist:
01. Jingo
02. Evil Ways (Album Version)
03. Black Magic Woman / Gypsy Queen
04. Oye Como Va
05. Samba Pa Ti
06. She’s Not There
07. No One to Depend On
08. Open Invitation (Album Version)
09. Hold On
10. Bella
11. Winning
12. All I Ever Wanted
13. Dance Sister Dance (Baila Mi Hermana) (Album Version)
14. Europa (Earth’s Cry, Heaven’s Smile)
15. Everybody’s Everything
16. Soul Sacrifice (Album Version)

Download:

https://file.al/xfeed8ogey44/DSDmusic.link_SantanaTheBest0fSantana1998Reissue2015SACDIS0.part1.rar.html
https://file.al/a0trx4vkr40x/DSDmusic.link_SantanaTheBest0fSantana1998Reissue2015SACDIS0.part2.rar.html
https://file.al/7sewd49st6eo/DSDmusic.link_SantanaTheBest0fSantana1998Reissue2015SACDIS0.part3.rar.html
https://file.al/fpled6f11elf/DSDmusic.link_SantanaTheBest0fSantana1998Reissue2015SACDIS0.part4.rar.html

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10Jun/17Off

Santana – Santana III (1971) [MFSL 2016] SACD ISO

Santana – Santana (1969) [MFSL 2016]
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 41:07 minutes | Scans included | 1,67 GB
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab # UDSACD 2158 | Genre: Rock

Santana III is an album that undeservingly stands in the shadows behind the towering legend that is the band’s second album, Abraxas. This was also the album that brought guitarist Neal Schon – who was 17 years old – into the original core lineup of Santana. Percussionist Thomas “Coke” Escovedo was brought in to replace (temporarily) José Chepitó Areas, who had suffered a brain aneurysm, yet who recovered quickly and rejoined the band. The rest were Carlos, organist Gregg Rolie, drummer Michael Schrieve, bassist David Brown, and conguero Michael Carabello. “Batuka” is the powerful first evidence of something being very different. The band was rawer, darker, and more powerful with twin leads and Schon’s harder, edgier rock & roll sound paired with Carlos’ blend of ecstatic high notes and soulful fills. It cooks – funky, mean, and tough. “Batuka” immediately transforms itself into “No One to Depend On,” by Escovedo, Carabello, and Rolie. The middle section is highlighted by frantic handclaps, call-and-response lines between Schon and Rolie, and Carlos joining the fray until the entire track explodes into a frenzied finale. And what’s most remarkable is that the set just keeps on cooking, from the subtle slow burn of “Taboo” to the percussive jam workout that is “Toussaint l’Overture,” a live staple in the band’s set list recorded here for the first time (and featuring some cooking Rolie organ work at its beginning). “Everybody’s Everything” is here, as is “Guajira” and “Jungle Strut” – tunes that are still part of Santana’s live show. With acoustic guitars, gorgeous hand percussion, and Santana’s fragile lead vocal, “Everything’s Coming Our Way” is the only “feel good” track here, but it’s a fitting way to begin winding the album down with its Schon and Santana guitar breaks. The album ends with a completely transformed reading of Tito Puente’s “Para los Rumberos,” complete with horns and frantic, almost insanely fast hand drumming and cowbell playing. It’s an album that has aged extremely well due to its spare production (by Carlos and the band) and its live sound. This is essential Santana, a record that deserves to be reconsidered in light of its lasting abundance and vision.

Tracklist:
01. Batuka
02. No One To Depend On
03. Taboo
04. Toussaint L’Overture
05. Everybody’s Everything
06. Guajira
07. Jungle Strut
08. Everything’s Coming Our Way
09. Para Los Rumberos

Mastered by Rob LoVerde at Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab, Sebastopol, CA.

Download:

https://file.al/98dq3sw4vzt5/DSDmusic.link_SantanaSantanaIII1971MFSL2016SACDIS0.part1.rar.html
https://file.al/6nzdk663bjhr/DSDmusic.link_SantanaSantanaIII1971MFSL2016SACDIS0.part2.rar.html

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10Jun/17Off

Santana – Santana (1969) [MFSL 2015] SACD ISO

Santana – Santana (1969) [MFSL 2015]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 36:55 minutes | Scans included | 1,5 GB
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab # UDSACD 2151 | Genre: Rock

Carlos Santana was originally in his own wing of the Latin Rock Hall of Fame, neither playing Afro-Cuban with rock guitar, as did Malo, nor flavoring mainstream rock with percussion, as did Chicago. His first record, as with the best fusion, created something a little different than just a mixture – a new style that, surprisingly, remains all his own. Granted that Latin music has seeped into the mainstream since, but why aren’t Van Halen and Metallica listening to this? Where they simmer, Santana boils over.

Tracklist:
01. Waiting
02. Evil Ways
03. Shades of Time
04. Savor
05. Jingo
06. Persuasion
07. Treat
08. You Just Don’t Care
09. Soul Sacrifice

Mastered by Shawn R. Britton at Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab, Sebastopol, CA.

Download:

https://file.al/i8cn4bdilwi3/DSDmusic.link_SantanaSantana1969MFSL2015SACDIS0.part1.rar.html
https://file.al/eclbj4qf3nkm/DSDmusic.link_SantanaSantana1969MFSL2015SACDIS0.part2.rar.html

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